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Is British real estate still worth investing when the drama
Guide reading:On the one hand, the British government attaches great importance to the supervision of housing, and has always attached great importance to the strong supervision of housing construction, which makes the quality of British houses too hard, many old V
On October 24, 2018, British Prime Minister Teresa announced to parliamentarians that the talks had been completed by 95% after returning to Britain after the EU summit.
 
Speaking of the European Union and Britain's break-away drama, the dog-blooded drama has been in full swing since former British Prime Minister Cameron first mentioned the referendum in 2013. Looking back on this "serial", it has been serialized for five years unconsciously.
 
Now there are less than 100 days before the formal break-away from Europe. I thought the series was coming to an end, but I didn't expect a small climax of "acting" recently. The European Union and Britain from marriage to break up, which are full of fairly dog-blooded plot, in addition to let us these people eat melon to see the theatre, there is a question worthy of our consideration, the next British real estate is worth investing?
 
Is British real estate still worth investing when the drama of "breaking away from Europe" is coming to an end?
 
Last year, British real estate investment totaled more than 60 billion.  Overseas buyers have become absolutely dominant as the pound has fallen, with China, the United States and Germany in the top three.  According to British investors'statistics, in 2017, 49 real estate investments were made by Chinese investors in Britain. Even excluding the 12.25 billion euro CIC deal, China's total investment in British real estate exceeded 10 billion, at least twice as much as in 2016.
 
Emerging Trends in Real Estate, 2018, published by PricewaterhouseCoopers United Urban Land Institute. The report conducted 516 questionnaires for real estate enterprises in 22 European countries and regions, including 306 in-depth interviews with industry leaders, and analyzed real estate investment and development expectations in 31 European cities in 2018.
 
Nearly half of the respondents expected economic growth in Europe to improve in the next five years, so the prospects for real estate investment in most European cities are also optimistic. 65% of respondents believe that the return on investment in European real estate will be higher in 2018 than in 2017. 79% of respondents expect that the return on European real estate will be as high as 5% - 20%.
 
Chinese investors'buying of British real estate is inseparable from British economic strength, market stability and cultural and educational advantages. Even after leaving the EU, Britain is still the economic center of Europe, with its economic development, infrastructure construction and education ranking among the top in the world.
 
1. Absolute reassurance of property rights
Many British houses have permanent property rights, which means that if you don't sell them, the house belongs to you and your heirs. The land of other houses, although limited to useful life, can indeed last for 2-9 centuries, and even after it expires, it can be renewed at a small cost.
 
At the same time, Britain's political and economic stability, low crime rate, less natural disasters, the average rent rate of housing stabilized at 5-10%, so in the world the British real estate is famous for value-preserving, value-added, so the high return of real estate is high.
 
Is British real estate still worth investing when the drama of "breaking away from Europe" is coming to an end?
 
2. Real estate in Britain is relatively safe
Since the British referendum began, although the British economy has been affected to some extent, the housing market has also been questioned by all parties, many investors are more cautious, but compared with other countries, it is still relatively safe to buy in the UK.  Because Britain, as an old capitalist country and the financial center of the world, attracts a large number of people from all over the world. In addition, Britain has a relatively narrow geographical area and limited new land resources for development. Moreover, it is complicated to regulate and control land by means of state administration. Therefore, Britain's real estate has been in short supply for a long time.
 
According to research conducted by authoritative bodies, London's housing prices have risen by nearly 70% in the past decade, more than tripling the rate of housing prices in the UK as a whole, and raising the national average to 407,900 in 2017, which is 12.9 times the national average income. Meanwhile, the average down payment required for first-time home purchases in London was close to 100,000 pounds, almost four times the overall average in the UK.
 
Because of the uncertainties that continue to emerge from Europe, many authorities expect UK house prices to gradually stabilize in 2019. Greater economic and political certainty should bring UK house prices back to growth in 2020. London's average house price is expected to increase by 33,000 pounds in the next five years. This will eventually lead to an average London property price of more than 500,000 in 2022.
 
3. British houses are of high quality
People who have been to Britain will never forget the old houses that are everywhere in the streets of Britain. Some of them have been used for hundreds of years, but they are still in use. This is in sharp contrast to many tofu dregs projects in China.
 
On the one hand, the British government attaches great importance to the supervision of housing, and has always attached great importance to the strong supervision of housing construction, which makes the quality of British houses too hard, many old Victorian houses are still in use; on the other hand, 80% of the houses built in the UK every year have NHBC insurance, which lasts for 10 years. What else do you worry about?