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The U.S. Immigration Service has released an insignificant p
Guide reading:Nancy, a disabled person, came to the United States legally on a medical visit visa. Her doctor needs her to be treated for six months. She returned home after the treatment, but going back too early would do harm to her health. USCIS rejected the ext
The Immigration Service (USCIS) has recently quietly released an insignificant message that those who adjust their status in the United States will be immediately included in the deportation process and repatriated if they are refused.
 
Priority Repatriation: More than Criminals
 
According to Quartz magazine, the Federal Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) announced that "beneficiaries" in non-citizen applications would be placed in expulsion proceedings if rejected.  These "beneficiaries" include applications for visa extension or change, green cards or citizenship.
 
Once in the deportation process, a non-citizen must prove that he is eligible to stay in the United States. Without a lawyer to provide him, he could be detained and released on bail. There is no right to a speedy trial or a jury trial.
 
This means that the priority procedure of the Immigration Service for repatriation is no longer the priority of criminal records, but greatly expands the category of "priority law enforcement".
 
For a long time, it has been easier to adjust identity within the United States than outside the United States, but it will not be so simple in the future. For example, if a tourist visa is refused in an immigration interview in the United States, it will be immediately included in the deportation process and deported.
 
The U.S. Immigration Service has released an insignificant piece of news... Large-scale repatriation of these people!
 
These five situations can also be repatriated.
 
The quartz magazine lists five possible expulsions. Surprisingly, none of these five cases is the fault of the parties or the possibility of expulsion.
 
1. Repatriation of foreign students
 
Jack, a foreign student, applied for a visa extension. He is in the period of validity of his visa. He moved out of the campus and applied to USCIS for a change of address. Later, the agency sent a patch notice to his old address. Jack never received it. USCIS refused to postpone because it had not received a response for a long time. Jack is now facing repatriation.
 
2. Real marriage is also repatriated
 
Maria stayed in the United States on a fiancee visa and applied for a green card. Her husband has American citizenship, a good job and health insurance. Before the green card interview, Maria was diagnosed with breast cancer. Officials discovered this and rejected her green card application, saying she might become a recipient of government relief.  Maria is also facing repatriation.
 
3. H-1B visa repatriated
 
Sam is a software engineer. His employer provided him with a green card, but the company was acquired by another company. USCIS rejected the application, saying there was insufficient evidence that the new company could continue to provide guarantees instead of the old one. Sam faces repatriation.
 
4. Repatriation for treatment in the United States
 
Nancy, a disabled person, came to the United States legally on a medical visit visa. Her doctor needs her to be treated for six months. She returned home after the treatment, but going back too early would do harm to her health. USCIS rejected the extension, saying the doctor did not fully explain why she needed to stay. Nancy faces repatriation.