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PR, green card, permanent residence, naturalization? Do you
Guide reading:Of course, there are also some convenient immigration projects, which can skip the "temporary residence" link and take permanent residence directly in place. For example, the emigrants of outstanding talents in the United States, EB1A and NIW, 132 emi
In the process of applying for immigration, many people often ask: Is it not Chinese after I get the green card? PR, green card, permanent residence, naturalization... How much do you know? Today, Xiaobian is here to popularize science for you. Those silly and indistinguishable nouns in the process of immigration.
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Green card
Because permanent residence permits in the United States are green, people are accustomed to calling them green cards, while permanent residence cards in Canada have maple leaves on them, so they are called maple leaf cards.
Green card, Yongju and PR are the same thing. Getting a green card is equivalent to becoming a resident of the country, i.e. having the right to stay permanently there.
 
Temporary residence
That is, temporary residence permit. Many countries have introduced immigration projects, which first issue a temporary residence permit, and then issue a permanent residence permit several years later. "Linju" is a transitional stage leading to "permanent residence".
 
nationality
Formally become a citizen of a country and hold its passport.
Back to the question at the beginning: Isn't it Chinese when I get the American Green Card?
When you get the American Green Card, you are an American resident, but you are still a Chinese citizen, called an overseas Chinese.
Only when you become a citizen of the United States, when you become an American, that is what we call Chinese.
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So what is the relationship between temporary residence, permanent residence and nationality?
Simply put, when you emigrate to a country, you usually get a temporary residence permit first. After meeting certain conditions or years, you can exchange it for a permanent residence permit (green card). After meeting certain conditions or years, you can join the nationality of the country and obtain the passport of that country.
Green cards allow you to live permanently in the country and enjoy some of the benefits of the country; naturalization allows you to enjoy all the rights and benefits of the country, including the right to vote and stand for election, and the exemption of more than 100 countries around the world.
Of course, there are also some convenient immigration projects, which can skip the "temporary residence" link and take permanent residence directly in place. For example, the emigrants of outstanding talents in the United States, EB1A and NIW, 132 emigrants of business talents in Australia, and investment immigrants in Quebec, Canada, etc.
Others skipped the two stages of "temporary residence" and "permanent residence" to naturalize directly and obtain the country's passport. For example, Malta's naturalization plan, Cyprus's naturalization plan and Caribbean's passport project, etc. These countries often allow dual nationality. On the premise of retaining Chinese nationality, they have a foreign passport, which is exempt from more than 100 countries worldwide. Travel is much more convenient.
Some people want to retain Chinese nationality, but also need the right to reside in a foreign country, so green card is a good choice; some people want to stay abroad for a lifetime, then they become naturalized and become foreign Chinese.